fish, snorkel

SNORKEL TREASURE!

Families that snorkel together, keep memories forever!

Families that snorkel together, keep memories forever!

If you have read our past posts, you will be well aware of the awful conditions that we have experienced for way too long, resulting in countless tours being cancelled and so, so many disappointed guests.

We are seeing some relief from this unusual weather - last week we managed to get out for 2 days, and this week we have also managed a couple of days. This has been very tough on the local operators during what is considered to be the highest season of the year.

What is amazing, are the days of total calm between all the storms which truly brings to life the saying "the calm before the storm", although we are changing that to "the calm between the storms" for this year!

Of course, being able to go ahead with excursions with guests concerned that they might miss this experience with the stingrays, and ants-in-the-pants crew members, engenders a lot of excitement which is almost palpable.

And so it was a great big cherry on the top when we spotted these beautiful morays at the snorkeling site we chose for the day. We know Elvis the Green Moray very well, and occasionally spot another Green Moray along Cayman's North Sound reef, but to find these two morays at the Coral Gardens AND right next to each was just amazing! The Caribbean water was amazing clear and Captain Mario managed to get this stunning shot!

A Viper Moray and a Goldentail Moray alongside each other at the Coral Gardens

A Viper Moray and a Goldentail Moray alongside each other at the Coral Gardens

What beauts!

The Viper Moray is the dark one, closer to you the viewer. They usually reach a maximum of 3 feet in lengths, are dark over their entire bodies, and have very arched jaws which only touch at the tip of the mouth, thus constantly displaying their impressive teeth. They are generally nocturnal fish and feed on fish or octopus. The above photo shows a well known characteristic of them - their sit and wait approach to feeding - sticking their heads out of the coral and waiting until dinner swims past and wham! dinner is done.

The prettier one behind the Viper Moray is called a Goldentail Moray - far lighter background colouring with dots that spread over the body. The dots start small in size on the snout and progressively grow bigger towards the tail. They are small and are not expected to reach a length greater than 2 feet. They have tiny teeth which are used during night forays to catch themselves acarnivorous meal - usually solitary creatures, so the above picture shows an unusual behaviour.

We had some divers out on the boat with us for this tour, and they were so incredibly in awe at finding these moray during a snorkel, as was Captain Moray who was over the moon at spotting them.

We hope they stay for a long time and that we can visit them frequently and show them to our guests who, we are sure, will equally enjoy seeing these marvellous fish!